Monthly Tips

Each month, a Thinking Organized tip is emailed to our growing list of educators, parents and students who want to improve their executive functioning skills.

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smortoMonthly Tips

Don’t Sweat the Test

Nearly everyone who has gone to school has felt nervous before or during a test. Students, especially those who are organizationally challenged, often feel they have too much to study and that they cannot possibly understand the material in time for an upcoming test. Some children are calm in the days leading up to an exam, but fall apart while testing. How do you know if your child is experiencing test anxiety? Be on the lookout for these common symptoms:

  • Physical signs of test anxiety include headaches, stomachaches, nausea, sleeplessness, faintness, dizziness, tense muscles, sweaty palms and trembling hands.
  • Emotional symptoms may involve crying, getting frustrated quickly, growing angry or snapping at others.

Although some stress is normal (and even beneficial), experiencing severe anxiety can cause a student to blank out or have racing thoughts that interfere with test performance.

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smortoDon’t Sweat the Test

Time Management for the Research Paper

 

Springtime seems to also be the season for term papers, projects and large-scale essays. Although this may be a good method to assess what a student has learned in the course of the school year, culminating assignments can present many challenges as well.

Research papers pose particular problems, especially for students who struggle with executive functioning skills. First of all, a deadline that is several weeks away is an invitation to procrastinate.

Teenagers especially are prone to feel that they have plenty of time and do not need to start too soon. However, research papers are lengthy and time-consuming assignments. Often, at least one part of the process will take longer than planned, or require a different approach than originally envisioned.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoTime Management for the Research Paper

Plan It Forward

It seems like the whole country has a spring break in March. College students are gearing up for trips home, ski vacations or warm beaches. Easter and Passover coincide this year, so many schools are off the last week of March.   Everyone is looking forward to a rest from the routines and pressures of school.

However, here’s the problem. When students come back from break, many of them act like summer vacation has already started. Senioritis becomes infectious, and children of all ages begin dreaming of sleeping late and having free time. Often, it’s up to the teachers and parents to say, “Wait! We’re not done yet.” When the going gets tough, organized thinkers need to model the steps of planning forward and preparing for the challenges ahead.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoPlan It Forward

Time is on Your Side

It is important for students to set both long-term and short-term goals for the current school year and years to come.

For example, “I want to go to college after I graduate from high school.  And this year I will begin to study several days before a test instead of just the night before.”

In order to achieve these goals, students need to learn effective planning, which includes deliberately setting objectives and taking specific steps to help them be efficient with their time.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoTime is on Your Side

2012, The Year In Review

As 2012 comes to a close, the ups and downs of the past year become footprints in the sands of time. Though the successes and challenges of 2012 are past, their memories have become a part of you and your child. How you set the stage for the future may in part be determined by your understanding of what has already occurred. Learning from past achievements and failures can prepare you for the future. Reviewing what worked and what didn’t is a crucial part of your journey toward “Thinking Organized.”

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smorto2012, The Year In Review

‘Tis the Season for Planning Ahead

With the beginning of December, we all realize that the year is coming to a close. The holidays are just around the corner and there are many errands to get done before families get together and the festivities begin. Year after year we see the importance of pre-planning, especially during this busy season. Cooking disasters and general stress overload can be prevented by careful forethought and “Thinking Organized.”

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smorto‘Tis the Season for Planning Ahead

Work that Memory Muscle!

How does one put information into the brain so that it can be easily retrieved? It helps to remember that the memory is a muscle that needs to be exercised. To keep your muscles strong, it’s important to work out regularly change your routine every now and then. Sometimes trying a different strategy for putting information into the brain can really strengthen that memory muscle!  Here are some different ways that we use at Thinking Organized to memorize information.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoWork that Memory Muscle!

Studying? What’s that?

Academic success comes easily for some students, but for most children, learning how to study is an educational process in itself.  How can parents help their children study effectively and succeed in school? Setting up some basic structures help students know what is required, plan their time, and learn how to learn.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoStudying? What’s that?

Who’s Your Teacher?

It’s September and along with all the freshly sharpened pencils and crisp clean notebooks come the anxieties and excitement of a new school year. Phones are ringing with eager queries of “Whose class are you in?” and “What teacher do you have for science?” Hoping for the “nicest” teacher is an annual wish, but learning to get along with different types of instructors is a skill that will render lifelong benefits. Here are some tips for helping your child succeed with ANY teacher that the educational system has to offer.

To subscribe and receive the full versions of our monthly tips, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoWho’s Your Teacher?

Scared to Start School?

Anxiety can be debilitating for many students, especially when transitioning to a new school. However, with some background work and proven strategies, parents can help their children anticipate the start of school with confidence.

To read more and subscribe to receive our monthly tip, please email: info@thinkingorganized.com.

smortoScared to Start School?